Windows For the Soul - Photography

Focus stacking a snail: how hard can that be?

I was hoping to have the little crawler’s cooperation for this shot. It was meant to be a macro shot using focus stacking. The day before I had found an equally tiny one that was quite still on a flower, probably eating. It was still but only until I gave it a couple of speedlight flashes and it started moving. So much for the focus stacking... This time round, I decided not to use the speedlight, lest the little guy went berserk like the one the day before. This proved to be a bit of a challenge, though. It was a rather cloudy morning, with the odd rain showers and too much wind for proper nature macro photography. With the flower pot on a cosier corner of the backyard, there was a little less wind, so there was some hope that I could focus properly. Unfortunately, the little snail had a plan of its own and decided that it was time to move.
Definitely, this is not the best subject for focus stacking. Forgetting the focus stacking I would just settle for a normal close-up but whoever says that these guys move slowly has never tried to photograph them on the move, in poor light. There were a couple of conditions to juggle besides the poor light: a nasty wall behind the flower pot that I wanted totally blurred and to avoid as much as possible as a background; some ugly damaged leaves on the plant that needed to be dealt with; the speed had to be such that I could keep the focus on the moving snail with the flimsy depth of field I had; the aperture could not be too wide or I would have no depth of field at all; I had to crank up the ISO to be able to have enough shutter speed whilst having just enough depth of field but also enough blur. The Nikon D7000 can deal with ISO as high as1000/1250 without significant noise and with ISO1000 I managed to cope with the conditions I had. The hardest part was chasing such a restless little thing around the flower with the camera stuck on the tripod.

Snail on flower_7SC7573
Nikon D7000, Nikon 105 mm f/2.8, ISO 1000, 1/100, f/7.1, Tripod.

For the missus

After a heavy shower, the wife’s camellia seemed to be a good excuse to make use of the macro lens. Unfortunately, the vase is in a rather messy corner of the garden and all the dirt left by the non-stop rainy days would have spoilt the photo. In broad daylight it was just too much dirt around for me to able to conceal it in the shot. Under-exposing the shot to kill ambient light, the hardest part was trying to juggle the speedlight’s power to have just enough light on the flower whilst keeping the close-by background dark and not having nasty highlights on the camellia and on the water drops. I wanted just enough depth of field to have as much of the flower as possible in focus and the tripod helped to hold the camera and the focus steady, as I had to bend over in a rather awkward position. If I had framed it in such a way as to included a bit more of the flower on the right-hand side of the shot, I would have had to include a damaged leaf and, of course, damaging the missus’ plant by cutting out the damaged leaf was not an option...

Camellia_7SC6249
Nikon D7000, Nikon 105 mm f/2.8, ISO 100, 1/13, f/29, Tripod, SB-28 off-camera.

A helping hand

I left home committed to get the shot properly, this time. I had been there the day before, on my way to picking up the little one from school at lunch hour, but because of the strong sun and the fact that I was without my hood loupe I could not check the result properly on the spot. When I got in front of my computer, I wasn’t quite happy with the outcome. So, there I was again, at the same daisy covered field, but this time I went there early in the morning, just after I dropped the offspring at school. Tough luck...it was a rainy morning. I had to go back to work but I did not want the few minutes of the detour to go to waste. So, like I said, I was committed to getting “the” shot, but I would settle for “a” shot.

Nature has this way of giving us a motive when we least expect. In front of me I had nothing but a field of “sleeping” soaked flowers, but the light was soft, the grass was green and with a little help from nature I found a reason to kneel down. In a whole field there was this one little daisy that decided I needed a help.

Single open daisy_7SC6821
Nikon D7000, Nikon 105 mm f/2.8, ISO 800, 1/200, f/6.3.