Windows For the Soul - Photography

Jurassic Park

This poor fellow has seen better days. Although spring is here and the odd sunny spells allow some sunbathing, relentless showers and temperature drops give this lizard a hard time. He has been returning to this wall for the past few days whenever there is a sunny break between the rain. I do not know much about these animals but this one seems to be going through a rough time. It tolerates my presence just a few centimetres away for some time, as long as I do not make sudden movements. Of course, this means that I have some time to photograph it. It is not an easy task, though, as the extremely short distance means that my DOF is minimal, even if I use smaller apertures and I must bear in mind that it can decide to move any time.

On the first of these two shots, I thought that a lower angle, shooting from below the edge of the wall, would give it a strange look as if it was some giant creature. To do this, however, the lizard would be strongly backlit by the sun shining through the grey clouds. Using an off-camera diffused speedlight, powered down and flashing upwards, I could underexpose the lizard to avoid blowing up the highlights in the sky. The result could be a lot better, I know, but I was happy to be able to balance the manual flash with the ambient light, preserving the sky whilst correctly exposing the lizard.
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Nikon D600, Nikon 105 mm f/2.8, ISO 1600, 1/160, f/36, SB-28 off-camera, Triggers, diffuser.


On the second photo I struggled to achieve enough DOF to avoid having most of the lizard’s head out of focus. The extremely short distance forced me to use a smaller aperture but I wanted to keep the background totally out of focus, to avoid having the neighbours’ fence and the fields behind my house visible on the shot. This is the only angle that keeps the green background instead of having walls on the shot, but this aperture seems to have been enough for my purposes. I would have liked to have diffused the light a bit to avoid those highlights on the lizard’s side, but I feared that I could scare the lizard (he was rather more active at the time, hence the shutter speed a little higher) and I would have blocked the reflex of the sky on its eye. The aperture and speed settings meant that I had to bump up the ISO a little, but that is something that using the D600 I am quite comfortable with, even at higher ISO settings. Great camera and after about 2500 shutter releases there is still no debris on my sensor. Knock on wood....

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Nikon D600, Nikon 105 mm f/2.8, ISO 1250, 1/320, f/14.